Australian Sepsis Network

The Australian Sepsis Network is a collaborative of individuals and organisations working to improve outcomes for patients with sepsis and to provide information and support to the families and friends of people with sepsis. To find out more, visit www.australiansepsisnetwork.net.au

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Sepsis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous adults: a population cohort study

An estimate of the incidence and outcomes of sepsis hospitalisations in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous adults in Australia’s most populous state, New South Wales (NSW)
1 Credit(s)

1 CPD point, 1 CE Contact Hour
Providers: CPDUK, CBRN

Kelly Thompson Read bio

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Kelly Thompson

Kelly Thompson

NHMRC Emerging Leader, Critical Care Division, The George Institute, Australia

Kelly Thompson is an NHMRC Emerging Leader working with the Global Women’s Health program and Critical Care Division at The George Institute for Global Health.

Kelly’s doctorate evaluated the epidemiology, economics, and long-term outcomes of patients treated for sepsis in Australian intensive care units. Her focus was primarily on understanding the cost-effectiveness and sex-related treatment differences of corticosteroid therapy for critically ill patients with septic shock. Her research found sex differences in both the cost-effectiveness of treatment, where corticosteroid therapy was more cost-effective in women compared to men and in clinical outcomes, where men were found to have some improved clinical outcomes, compared to women.

Since 2018, Kelly has spearheaded the establishment of The George Institute’s, Global Women’s Health Program, taking responsibility for building research strategy and teams across the Institute’s offices in Australia, China, India, and the UK.

She is an honorary research fellow with The Australian Sepsis Network and a member of the Taskforce on Women and NCDs. 

Kelly is passionate about achieving health equity for underserved populations globally, particularly women and girls. Improving health equity in sepsis is the focus of her NHMRC postdoctoral fellowship.

Live Webinar Times
This lecture is being prerecorded and will be available to watch at 4pm AEST on 25th March

Talk Summary
The aim of this research was to estimate the incidence and outcomes of sepsis hospitalisations in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous adults in Australia’s most populous state, New South Wales (NSW). This was a prospective cohort study of residents aged 45 years and older, recruited between 2006 and 2009 and followed for hospitalisation for sepsis. We measured the incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of sepsis hospitalisation and ICU admission. Sepsis was identified using the International Classification of Diseases (10th Revision) coding on hospital discharge data. We found sepsis hospitalisation is higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, but much of this excess risk attenuated after adjusting for sociodemographic risk factors. Culturally appropriate, community-led strategies targeting chronic disease prevention and the social determinants of health may reduce this gap.

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this lecture the attendee will be able to:

  1. identify sepsis in hospital administrative records using the International Classification of Diseases (10th Revision) coding system.
  2. determine differences in risk of hospitalisation for sepsis in different population groups, using Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians as a case study.
  3. describe the incidence of sepsis hospitalisations in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults living in NSW.
  4. describe the differences in outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians following a sepsis hospitalisation.

This lecture is equal to 1 CPD Point and 1 CE Contact Hour.

Podcast: ASN1 - Kelly Thompson